EDsessions Schedule

  • TuesdayNovember 1
  • WednesdayNovember 2
  • ThursdayNovember 3
  • FridayNovember 4
1:00 PM –
1:15 PM

Dealer Boot Camp: Welcome and Overview

 Rm 254
1:15 PM –
2:00 PM

Dealer Boot Camp: ES2016 Section 101: Discover the Education Marketplace

Start the Dealer Boot Camp off right by getting the 10,000 foot view of what is going on in the education marketplace. Discover the current trends in education, what is happening in school construction, the factors driving change, and some of the state-of-the-art ideas and concepts in facility planning, funding, and design at both PK-12 schools and colleges and universities. Learn what makes the education market unique, what trends are influencing growth opportunities, enrollment trends, demographics changes, and more.

Speaker
Deb Moore
Executive Editor/Publisher, School Planning & Management/College Planning & Management
2:15 PM –
3:15 PM

Dealer Boot Camp: ES2016 Section 102: How Schools Buy

Companies that sell products and services to the U.S. education market face many challenges. This session will explain K-12 funding sources, the procurement process and purchasing cycles, the bid process, GSA and state contracts, the seasonality of school market, and more – all in an effort to help dealers be the most effective resource to schools.

Speaker
Bob Redding
VP Sales, Bretford Manufacturing
Speaker
Hart Sernick
VP and General Manager, Schoolhouse Products, Inc.
3:30 PM –
5:00 PM

Dealer Boot Camp: ES2016 Section 103: Furniture Specification Training

This session will cover the basics needed for writing specification for the education market. Discover how to determine the quality level of furniture, why some goods and materials cost more, what the terminology means, the ins and outs of testing, and how to correlate a buyers budget to the degree of use and product longevity they are expecting.

Speaker
Dan Glass
Midwest Resource Group
5:00 PM –
6:00 PM

Networking Happy Hour (Participants of Dealer Boot Camp)

Dealer Boot Camp Sponsors

8:00 AM –
9:00 AM

Furniture Bond Planning for the 21st Century Learning Environment

Community-based Design Planning for a LEED Platinum School

The LEED Platinum addition of the Chiaravalle Montessori School’s North Wing is a model for environmental responsibility for the school and Evanston community while providing endless learning opportunities for students. The project is believed to be the first LEED Platinum-registered Montessori school in the United States. Learn how the community-based planning process and Montessori principles served as a design catalyst that built an innovative, student-centered learning environment, celebrates the Chiaravalle community, and expresses ecological principles inherent in Montessori curriculum.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how an architectural discovery process, aligned with Montessori principles, led to design goals that reflected environmental responsibility.
  • Understand how Chiaravalle Montessori’s goal of creating and supporting global citizens resulted in a LEED Platinum addition that makes learning central to the building’s design.
  • Explain how community and family enrich the curriculum and student experience, and how the building design responds to the need for shared community space.
  • Explain how technological and architectural innovations can be used to enhance a Montessori learning environment.
  • LU/HSW = 1    Rm 326
Speaker
Stuart Brodsky
AIA, LEED AP, Senior Vice President, CannonDesign
Speaker
Robyn McCloud-Springer
Head of School, Chiaravalle Montessori School

Spatial Implications of Early Childhood Pedagogy

It is a settled matter that the learning environment exerts considerable influence on students’ learning outcomes, but it is less clear what the relationship between pedagogy and space could be, in an ideal world scenario. While much is made of the correlation between space and results, there is very little documented thinking on the relationship of specific spatial design decisions and their impact on learning. In light of the discreet number of well-defined, distinct pedagogical strategies that guide early childhood education, we believe that this is perhaps the most clear-cut arena in which to explore how specific design decisions (open/confined, inside/outside, bright/dark, large/medium/small, connected/self-contained, etc.) influence, for good or ill, the impact of the teaching methods.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to identify the relationship between pedagogy and space.
  • Discover the impact of spatial decisions on teaching and learning.
  • Learn how early childhood students are affected by specific design decisions.
  • Find out how teachers are impacted on the design of learning environments.
  • LU = 1    Rm 302
Speaker
John Noble, AIA
University of Cincinnati Adjunct Professor; Project Architect, SHP Leading Design
9:15 AM –
10:30 AM

OPENING PLENARY: The Future of Education In Cincinnati: Revisioning in a Growing City

Cincinnati is a vibrant and growing metropolis of over 2.2 million people, with the nation’s largest number of Fortune 500 companies per capita, world-class arts and sports, and a low cost of living. It also has arguably one of the best overall early-learning-through-higher education environments in the nation, yet like most cities still faces serious challenges. How is it responding to the need to improve education for our kids? What does this mean for our environments and communities? This engaging panel discussion will bring together many of the key players in education in the area to talk about how changes in our understanding of what is critical are driving new approaches and a revisioning of what is possible. Participants will introduce their organizations and their missions and our facilitator will lead them through a series of issues. Time will be left for questions from the audience.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn why Cincinnati has one of the nation’s best learning environments in their school system and what has contributed to its success.
  • Find out what challenges city and school leaders face in bringing about change and how the design community is an integral party.
  • Discover what needs to be done to improve education outcomes for all students and architects can support this mission.
  • Understand what is driving new approaches in the visioning and re-visioning process.
  • LU = 1    Junior Ballroom
Moderator
Dan Hurley
President of Applied History Associates, Cincinnati newscaster at Local 12/WKRC
Speaker
Mary Ronan
Superintendent of Cincinnati Public Schools
Speaker
Greg Landsman
Cincinnati Preschool Promise
Speaker
Steve Shifman
President/CEO of Michelman, Inc.; Co-chair of the Education Committee of the Cincinnati Regional Business Committee
Speaker
Stephanie Byrd
Executive Director, Success By 6 at United Way of Greater Cincinnati

Sponsored by AIA Committee on Architecture for Education

11:00 AM –
12:00 PM

Outdated and Underutilized Classrooms and Libraries — the Evolution of Learning and Media Spaces

As media has evolved, so has the role it plays in our lives…and our learning environments. This session is a round table conversation featuring voices that have helped guide this evolution at the k12 and collegiate levels. We will discuss the new roles these spaces play in institutional culture and some of the pitfalls they face.

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the evolution of media and how it has affected the built environment, specifically in learning spaces.
  • Hear from school administration on how they have worked within fixed budgets and existing building footprints to create innovative and multi-functional media and learning spaces from previously underutilized spaces.
  • Learn about the benefits to students, administrators, and the community from these spaces.
  • Discover the process and approach taken from initial project discovery to project completion and occupancy.
 Rm 302
Moderator
Amy Benetti
AIA, Associate Principal/Project Manager, MSA Architects
Speaker
Kenji Matsudo
Superintendent, Madeira City School District
Speaker
Robert Sheeran
Xavier University, Vice President for Facilities, Division of Financial Administration
Speaker
Robyn Case
Adult Services Librarian, Wright Memorial Public Library

Moving the Needle: Creating an Agile Environment for Learning

Join the conversation and explore what spatial possibilities emerge when a community sets out to totally rethink the basic assumptions behind traditional elementary schools in order to build a culture that wraps around kids so they are learning all day, every day, and throughout the year; in environments where learners are continuously challenged, relentlessly supported, and engaged in a way that is both safe and healthy. Discover how designing for the myriad of ways in which students learn necessitates that we re-vision the very basic givens in schools.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the range of voices that contribute to a rich process and the value of embracing the complexities of the design task.
  • Learn how tools for a collaborative design process can help drive innovative educational goals.
  • Discover the power of employing both hard and soft design in tandem; how can the marriage of facility, furniture and practice insure each student has an opportunity for deep learning?
  • Take a deep dive into the design of Arlington Elementary as a response to the District‘s Vision that: if education is a living, breathing organism, how can a facility be evolutionary?
  • LU = 1    Rm 326
Speaker
JoAnn Wilcox
Associate Principal, Mahlum Architects
Speaker
Rob Sawatzky
Director of Planning and Construction, Tacoma Public Schools
Speaker
Royce Bixby
Assoc. AIA, LEED AP

A New Way Forward

When faced with funding cuts and declining student performance, the Winton Woods School District leadership knew they had to make some significant changes to get a different outcome. The district was awarded a Straight A Innovative Schools Grant, and in partnership with the New Tech Network, will completely transform all buildings in the district over the next two years. This session will offer an in-depth look at the steps Winton Woods has taken to create a vibrant academic cultural built upon 21st century skills.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how deeper learning—through the lens of project-based learning—impacts educational equity.
  • Learn about the plan Winton Woods has to transform education at every grade level and in every building through project-based learning.
  • Discover how facility design can support educational outcomes and cultivate 21st century skills.
  • Hear student’s perspectives on the power of deeper learning experiences.
  • LU = 1    Rm 314

Speaker
Terri Holden
Director of Teaching and Learning at Winton Woods City Schools
Speaker
Eric Martin
Principal at Winton Woods High School
With Special Student Appearances

Take a Stand for an Active Learning Environment

The amount of time students spend in sedentary positions on any given day has dramatically increased over the last 25 years. Most students spend the majority of their daytime classroom hours in a seated position, which has resulted in a wide variety of serious health risks. Josh Kerst will share the historical impact of the chair in the classroom on our bodies and how it has shaped our perception. With overwhelming evidence supporting the need for movement within the classroom we can no longer ignore these risks. Find out what steps your school should take to address this concern in this session and learn ways to positively impact student performance and wellbeing.

Learning Objectives:

  • Review the current body of scientific knowledge on sitting vs. standing vs. leaning/perching plus considerations and application guidelines to use in the classroom.
  • Analyze objective data on the multitude of health benefits associated with regular periods of active movement (Standing, Leaning, Perching, etc.).
  • Gain insight and highlights from Research at Texas A&M on Activity Permissive Learning Environments (APLE).
  • Discover a rational and financially responsible approach to implementing Activity Permissive Learning Environments within schools.
  • LU/HSW = 1    Rm 2148

Speaker
Josh Kerst
CPE, CIE, EVP – Principal Ergonomist, Safco Products
11:30 AM –
2:30 PM

EDspaces School Cafeteria

1:00 PM –
2:00 PM

What’s in Your Space? Combining Technology, Global Skills, and Learning Styles in a New Type of School

Today’s students are digital kids: they text, swipe, interact with a variety of screens, and are constantly connected. In this high energy, engaging presentation, the audience will hear of a series of steps to create a learning space that makes the most of technology usage, global skills, and Gen Z learning styles. The speakers will share their journey in creating Clark Hall, a unique high school building in Gahanna, Ohio, that was awarded Scholastic’s Best in Tech award for its combination of space and student technology. Learn how they included the voices of students, staff, and parents in the design of the building and how they formed partnerships with Dell, Intel, and Cisco to make the project affordable.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn practical ideas for designing learning spaces in K-12 schools around the learning styles of Gen Z, their use of technology, and global skills.
  • Gain a better understanding of Gen Z and how it learns.
  • Be exposed to mindset points that promote change and adaptation.
  • Gain insight into ways of incorporating global skills into a test-driven curriculum.
  • Understand the importance of technology in 21st century learning spaces.
  • LU = 1    Rm 302

Speaker
Dwight Carter
Principal of New Albany High School
Speaker
Mark White
Author, School Leader, Consultant

Educational Visioning and Student-Centered Learning Environments Overview (Part One)

Join experts in the Educational Visioning and Planning industry to discuss how the OFCC is working with schools to introduction the Educational Visioning process while in the early planning stages for their facility project. Children learn in a variety of ways and these flexible spaces help to achieve those learning goals in different ways. The flexible spaces call for unique design and movable furniture configurations in order to work correctly.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn what OSFC has done to promote SCLE and processes that have been developed.
  • Learn about SCLE school projects recently completed or underway in Ohio
  • Learn about challenges and opportunities offered by SCLE.
  • Learn about ways upcoming school projects can get involved.
  • LU = 1    Rm 326
Speaker
Glenn Rowell
Planning Manager, OFCC
Speaker
Frank Locker
Frank Locker Educational Planning
Speaker
Bill Prenosil
Planning Director, Ohio Facilities Construction Commission

Turning Dead Space Into A Revitalized Place: What Did We Get Right? What Did We Learn?

Poorly used space is everywhere in schools, particularly in libraries. It’s clear that as many districts grow and change that they will not get all the additional space they require. Space efficiency is therefore essential. Sycamore High School undertook a project at the start of the 2015–2016 school year to revitalize a library that was only minimally used by students. They enlisted the aid of VSWC architects and School Outfitters to plan, design and execute a space that supported the curriculum and long-term plan of this high-performing suburban district. This became known as the Sycamore Learning Hub. Now that we are one school year through this very successful transformation, the key participants discuss the impact on students, learning and school culture.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn how to maximize space within the school.
  • Discover how the school culture is impacted by design.
  • Learn how space impacts student learning.
  • Find out why space efficiency is so important to growing school populations.
  • LU = 1    Rm 314
Moderator
Tom Brennan
School Outfitters

Speaker
Brian Gilliland
AIA, LEED, Principal at VSWC Architects
Speaker
Doug Mader
M.A. in Educational Administration, Principal, Sycamore High School
Speaker
Chad Lewis
M.A. in Educational Administration, Director of Business Operations at Sycamore Community Schools
Speaker
Anne Marie Reinke
Asst Director of Academic Affairs, Sycamore Community Schools
Speaker
Angela Webb
Director of Sales, School Outfitters

Determine Curriculum Before Technology & Design

K-12 curriculum is changing rapidly. New common core standards and related assessments have an impact on what and how we teach, as well as how we test. These changes have also created an opportunity to harness updated methods of instruction, classroom design, and technology. However, it is vitally important for instruction, design, and technology groups to work together, ensuring the most appropriate resources are available and actually used. This presentation will cover the latest AV technology strategies for a variety of learning environments, providing decision makers with valuable insight to support their specific standards and goals.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how technology and classroom design support curriculum.
  • Learn about different classroom design approaches.
  • Explore AV technologies for the classroom.
  • Learn strategies for successful implementation that benefits all stakeholders.
  • LU = 1    Rm 2148
Speaker
Anthony Cortes
Director of Marketing, K-12 Classroom Systems, Extron Electronics
Speaker
Mike Jamerson
Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation, Columbus, Indiana
3:00 PM –
4:00 PM

The Maker Mindset: Design for Learning Trends

In this session, attendees will be exposed to research that supports learning environment design and student achievement, and receive a brief overview of some popular instructional models used in classrooms. We will share how our collaborative work with students has impacted design that better meets their needs. We will tap into our own maker mindsets to design for learner friendly environments in K-12 education. Attendees will discover trends and what’s missing in the learning commons, makerspaces, and other learning environments. Let’s design to meet the personalized and collaborative needs of students within instructional models that, in turn will lead to high achievement.

Learning Objectives:

  • Be introduced to 21st century instructional models teachers are implementing.
  • Focus on some popular trends in K-12 education and design to meet the needs of learners in their learning environments.
  • Design to fill the gaps recognized in the learning commons and makerspaces from student perspective and observation.
  • Be exposed to research that supports learning environment design and student achievement.
  • LU = 1    Rm 302
Speaker
Linda Conway
Director of Innovation and Design Center and Library Programming, Douglas County Schools
Speaker
Marci Milius
Learning Environment Designer, Douglas County Schools

Educational Visioning and Student-Centered Learning Environments – School District Panel Discussion (Part Two)

OFCC K-12 Planning Manager Melanie Drerup will be joined by experts in the Educational Visioning and Planning industry to discuss how the OFCC is working with schools to introduction the Educational Visioning process while in the early planning stages for their facility project. Children learn in a variety of ways and these flexible spaces help to achieve those learning goals in different ways. The flexible spaces call for unique design and movable furniture configurations in order to work correctly.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn what OSFC has done to promote SCLE and processes that have been developed.
  • Learn about SCLE school projects recently completed or underway in Ohio.
  • Learn about challenges and opportunities offered by SCLE.
  • Learn about ways upcoming school projects can get involved.
  • LU = 1    Rm 326
Moderator
Frank Locker
Frank Locker Educational Planning
Panelist
Eric Lowe
Superintendent, Beaver Local Schools, East Liverpool, OH
Panelist
Emmy Beeson
Superintendent, Ridgemont Local School District, Mount Victory, OH
Panelist
Keith Millard
Superintendent, Batavia Local Schools, Batavia, OH

How Can Learning Environments Become “Incubators” for Innovation?

Pecha Kucha was started in Tokyo in 2003 as an event for young designers to meet, network, and show their work in public. Drawing its name from the Japanese term for the sound of “chit chat”, it is a presentation format that is simple in concept: 20 images x 20 seconds. This session will be a Pecha Kucha format. Speakers from a variety of disciplines, backgrounds, and perspectives will present their thoughts, ideas, and inspirations pertaining to the notion of the learning environment as a “catalyst” for innovation.

  • Participants shall identify, formulate, and measure definitions of “innovation” and “learning environment” through the contrasting viewpoints of the presenters.
  • Participates shall be able to identify the intersections between learning environment design, pedagogy, and research, in support of innovative outcomes.
  • Participants shall discover alternate examples and benchmarks for innovation from other sources beyond education and architecture.
  • Through collaboration and discussion, participants shall evaluate holistic student-centered approaches to creating environments that support critical thinking and collaboration.
  • LU = 1    Rm 314
Moderator
Lisa Johnson
Principal, DLR Group; AIA, LEED AP

Speaker
Mary Beth McGrew
University Architect, University of Cincinnati
Speaker
Bryan Smith
Associate Director of Center for Education, Teaching and Learning, University of Cincinnati
Speaker
Shelly Engels
Interior Designer, Integrus Architecture
3:00 PM –
4:30 PM

Envisioning the Future of School Food

Are you prepared for the future of school food? Learn about the trends in sustainable food and school building practices. Envision the future of school food where students will enjoy eating meals that are prepared from scratch using fresh ingredients from the school garden and local farms, where children will practice being good stewards of the earth by recycling and composting, and where they are engaged in learning about food and nutrition in green school dining centers and classrooms. This is the future of school food. Attend this presentation and learn what it takes to build a sustainable food community at a district near you.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about new trends in sustainable food and building environments.
  • Find out a proven process of elevating school food programs to serve fresh, scratch cooked foods within budget.
  • Learn how to engage the school community in the sustainable food journey.
  • Explore real-life examples of how this sustainable food model is working now.
  • LU/HSW = 1    Classroom 2148
Speaker
Greg Christian
CEO/Founder, Beyond Green Sustainable Partners
Speaker
Karen Dittrich
Founder/Food Marketing Consultant, Creatif Leaf Marketing
Speaker
Leslie Johnson
VP for Finance and Operations, Nardin Academy
Speaker
Sheila Palinkas
FCSI, Principal, Senior Consultant, Foodservice Facility Designs by LMS Development, LLC
Speaker
Melanie Smythe
President, Candacity LLC
8:00 AM –
9:00 AM

Natural Light as a Planning Tool to Economically Transform Internalized Schools

Embracing a Growth Mindset: High School Learning Environments for the Next Decade and Beyond

Designers and educators sit at the ideal intersection to co-construct learning environments that address the serious social change needed in the move towards a growth mindset, where the learning milieu enables, engages and empowers all to achieve. Join the conversation and explore what spatial possibilities have begun to emerge around the world. What can happen when both program and place break free from the perspective that is dominated by the limitations of industrial-era school facilities? Using exemplar works, the panel will prompt simultaneous and generative dialogue on innovation that embodies a growth mindset for the next decade and beyond.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore the range of issues facing high school learners.
  • Learn how design thinking can reframe the perceived relationship between space and program.
  • Discover the power of employing both hard and soft design in tandem; how can the marriage of facility, furniture and practice ensure each student has an opportunity for deep learning?
  • Take a deep dive into international precedents that have embraced a growth mindset.
  • LU = 1    Rm 326
Speaker
JoAnn Wilcox
Associate Principal, Mahlum Architects
Speaker
John Dale
FAIA, LEED AP, Principal; Studio Leader, Harley Ellis Devereaux (HED)
Speaker
Karina Ruiz
AIA, LEED AP BD+C, Senior Principal, Dull Olson Weekes-IBI Group Architects

Arlitt Outdoor Playscapes and Early Childhood Development

Dr. Carr and her colleagues have been awarded a three year $1,635,115 National Science Foundation grant to study playscape interactions and design learning modules for early childhood teachers. Principal Investigator Carr and Co-Investigators are extending their work from a previous NSF supported project. The project is an NSF Research-in-Service of Practice project implemented in collaboration with local agencies and advised by a national board of researchers and experts in the field.

Learning Objectives:

  • Cognize the importance of nature play for young children.
  • Assess the significance of playscapes as a new paradigm for playgrounds.
  • Select the types of affordances in playscapes that elicit STEM learning in young children.
  • Describe the tenets of pedagogical teacher knowledge for facilitating nature-based STEM learning for young children.
  • LU = 1    Rm 302
Speaker
Victoria Carr
Professor, School of Education; Executive Director, Arlitt Center for Education, Research, & Sustainability Co-Editor, Children, Youth & Environments University of Cincinnati
9:15 AM –
10:30 AM

PLENARY: The New Math of School Facilities: Equity, Education, and the Learning Environment

As the complexity of school facilities management grows, we are learning more and more about the impacts that learning environments have on the children and adults who spend time in them. The sheer scale of U.S. public K–12 school facilities is staggering: every school day, nearly 50 million students and 6 million adults learn and work in close to 100,000 buildings. In fact, state and local governments invest more capital in K–12 public school facilities than in any other infrastructure sector outside of highways. Research shows that high-quality facilities help improve student achievement, reduce truancy and suspensions, improve staff satisfaction and retention, and raise property values.

This panel will discuss, from a variety of perspectives, what the real impacts of school facility conditions are and what we are learning about the lack of investment in this important infrastructure.

Learning Objectives:

  • Attendees will be able to cite important data from the 2016 State of Our Schools report
  • Attendees will be able to explain the connection between school facilities and equity of opportunity
  • Attendees will understand crucial findings of the “CogFX” study into human cognition and environmental factors (conducted by Harvard)
  • Attendees will be able to give examples of observable impacts of school environments on student health and performance
  • LU = 1    Junior Ballroom
Moderator
Josh Lasky
LEED AP, Green Apple Manager
USGBC Center for Green Schools

Speaker
Erika Eitland
Doctoral Student, Harvard Center for Health and the Global Environment
Speaker
John Chadwick
Assistant Superintendent, Facilities and Operations, Arlington (VA) Public Schools
Speaker
Lisa Laney
Sustainability Administrator, Ohio Facilities Construction Commission

Sponsored by USGBC Center for Green Schools

11:00 AM –
12:00 PM

Educational Commissioning: How to Succeed in the Design and Use of High Impact Learning Environments

As schools and school districts investigate what is necessary to incorporate active and socially positive teaching strategies, it becomes clear that the building is only one component of an extremely complex and involved process that requires “buy-in” at all levels of the community. Changing the paradigm of education delivery is supported by insightful building design and FF&E selection, but this begins, and ends, with the vision and continued professional development of those who live, work, and learn in these facilities. When an ongoing process of understanding and training is not established and continued, the result has proven to be failure.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore and understand what the purpose of educational commissioning is, and is not, and who needs to be involved in the commissioning process to increase the probability for success.
  • Through the case study, understand how the process of changing a curriculum to a more student-centered focus was successfully implemented, and how that process continues to be a method of ongoing refinement to address what works and what doesn’t.
  • Through the workshops, explore, understand, and develop strategies to address the pitfalls that school districts will confront when implementing a significant change in teaching paradigm.
  • Develop a framework for administering similar workshops in home districts.
  • LU = 1    Rm 302
Speaker
Page Dettmann
Ph.D., Executive Vice President of Educational Design, The Contrax Group, LLC
Speaker
Bill Latham
CEO, ALEP, The Contrax Group, LLC

Proven Strategies for Educating Gen Z – Partnering Models that are Reinventing Learning

The growing unrest among Millennials and Gen Y students is presenting a wake-up call to our nation’s K-16 education system. Increased globalization and technological innovations promise to seriously disrupt the futures of these generations in ways yet unknown. It’s hard to forecast the types of jobs that today’s kindergarteners will be pursuing 15-20 years from now. But we do know our education models need to acknowledge this unprecedented societal change. The Missouri Innovation Campus (MIC) offers a series of innovative strategies that address these challenges. It begins by thinking outside the box; exploring education with an expanded lens.

Learning Objectives:

  • Establish a process of your own to identify prospective partners in your region, host effective partnering sessions, establish a continual reassessment process of workforce needs, and use this as a visioning lens for future academic planning.
  • Take lessons from the workplace to instigate ‘business agility’ on your campus – agility in your facilities planning, academic programming, and pedagogy.
  • Learn about academic partnership agreements between a public school district, a state university, and a community college system and employ them in the development of your own academic partnerships, with ideas for overcoming the more challenging stumbling blocks.
  • Develop a culture that optimizes workplace skillsets for high school students; authentic learning environments that foster collaboration and professionalism; studios, labs, cross-disciplinary mixing zones, and third places.’
  • Adapt your learning culture to one that empowers student-directed learning, creates true accountability and ownership among students, and builds ‘T-shaped learners’ ready to enter the workforce running.
  • LU = 1    Rm 314
Speaker
Kevin Greischar
Principal, DLR Group
Speaker
David Reid
AIA , Principal, Gould Evans
Speaker
Stan Elliott
Director of Missouri Innovation Campus
Speaker
Elaine Metcalf
Director of Summit Technology Academy

Culture Shift: How Design Can Positively Impact the K-12 Experience

This presentation is designed to bring awareness to the importance of physical spaces and how they impact both school culture and the successful educational experience for today’s learners. The conditions for student success include high engagement, ownership, relationships, sense of community, a positive school climate, and places designed with the learner in mind. This presentation also discusses how school design has informed the 4 Essential Dimensions of School Climate, as indicated by the National School Climate Council, and how meaningful, impactful educational experiences happen when learning environments are designed to be flexible, adaptable, and comfortable.

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss how design influences our culture and how culture influences our behaviors with discussion prompts.
  • Small group discussion and quick activity to help participants understand school climate vs. school culture and how physical spaces have the potential to impact students’ educational experiences.
  • Recognize how the digital culture, modern workplaces, and flexible furniture have influenced new approaches to educational models. Participants will engage in brainstorming ideas for the following activity.
  • Identify opportunities through affinity mapping activity for designing essential spaces to meet the needs of today’s learners and educators to positively impact school culture.
  • LU = 1    Rm 2148
Speaker
Sharad Mathur
Artcobell VP of Sales, Marketing, and Product Development

Design Thinking for Active Learning

Design Thinking is not only an amazing tool for businesses and organizations; it can be a game changing device for teachers and their classrooms. But also more importantly it is an amazing resource for teachers IN their classrooms! Explore the parallels between the Design Thinking mindset and Active Learning pedagogy. In a two part presentation (part informative – part workshop) work with your peers to see design thinking in action and understand how it aligns with Common Core curriculum, the Maker Movement, Bloom’s Taxonomy and more. Learn how to apply Design Thinking in new ways while understanding its impact on Active Learning classroom design and school curriculum.

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand the parallels between Design Thinking and Active Learning pedagogy.
  • Understand the six modes for classroom design most impacted by the link between Design Thinking and Active Learning.
  • Learn how to apply Design Thinking in your design process and within the classroom.
  • Explore first-hand the Design Thinking process in solving difficult challenges.
  • LU = 1    Rm 326
Speaker
Brandon Thomas
Sales Leader, Learning Environments
One Workplace (a Steelcase Dealer)
Speaker
Kate Rancourt
Creative Lead
One Workplace (a Steelcase Dealer)
11:30 AM –
2:30 PM

EDspaces School Cafeteria

1:00 PM –
2:00 PM

Programming for the Third Space: Nimble Number Crunching for Innovation

Research indicates that spaces for informal interaction, which are currently lacking in many learning environments, are ripe for development as spaces that can heighten collaboration from peer to peer. In an environment of tight budgets and stretched capacity on college and university campuses, project goals must meet clear metrics to prove their worth. Innovative and hard-to-quantify collaboration spaces can fall by the wayside when establishing space needs and getting projects approved. Using a case study of an academic building at University of Massachusetts Amherst, this session will share new techniques for integrating “the third space” into a program of space needs to provide a more comprehensive active learning environment.

Learning Objectives:

  • Expand the approach for broader innovative learning spaces within academia and administration.
  • Rally administrative support for innovative ideas outside of traditional programmatic silos.
  • Illustrate the benefits of shared spaces to diverse user groups.
  • Find synergies within the program of space needs to create more and better active learning spaces for collaboration and interaction, leaving room for more informal, flexible “hang-out” space where learning can take its own course.
  • LU = 1    Rm 302
Speaker
Mike Nieminen
FAIA, Partner, Kliment Halsband Architects
Speaker
David Whitehill
AIA, Partner, Kliment Halsband Architects
Speaker
Thomas Huf
Senior Program Manager, Facilities Planning and Programming at the UMass Amherst Campus Planning Division

Ohio School Design: Evolution and Revolution

Join us to learn how the Ohio Facilities Construction Commission (OFCC) and local architecture firms have created some of the most innovative and energy-efficient schools in the country. You will learn how OFFC design standards have evolved from a traditional school design approach to the use of revolutionary concepts for Student Centered Learning Environments that are at the cutting-edge of flexibility and technology integration. You will also be inspired by examples of elementary schools, middle schools and high schools that are reshaping the educational landscape of the Buckeye State.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about the history of the Ohio’s state-wide school construction program.
  • Understand how Ohio’s school design guidelines have evolved to support revolutionary student-centered educational practices.
  • Learn how this revolutionary approach to school planning and design is being used to improve learning in schools throughout Ohio.
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Speaker
Stephen Wilczynski
AIA, LEED AP, Executive Director, Fanning Howey
Speaker
Melanie Drerup
LEED AP, CEFP, OCPM, Planning Manager, Ohio School Facilities Commission
Speaker
Jennifer Fuller
RA, Project Architect, Fanning Howey

Makerspaces – Design Thinking Meets Curriculum

This session will discuss the reasons behind the surge in the Maker Movement, the issues to consider in integrating makerspaces into your facility and the steps required to benefit students the most. You will discover how Design Thinking can be used as a model for employing maker concepts and opportunities within current educational programs. Learn first-hand from forward-thinking educational leaders, designers and collaborators who are capitalizing on the Maker Movement and its benefit to learning.

Learning Objectives:

  • How do makerspaces support curriculum?
  • How best to integrate this type of space within your facility.
  • How to make the most of a makerspace environment within a limited budget.
  • How to incorporate Design Thinking to encourage experimentation within or as a supplement to a defined curriculum.
  • Where is this initiative heading and its potential in the future.
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Speaker
Richard S. Thomas
AIA, ALEP, LEED AP, Vice President, SHP Leading Design
Speaker
Jeff Parker
Associate, SHP Leading Design
Speaker
Dr. Susan Hayward
Assistant Superintendent, Beavercreek City Schools
Speaker
Tom Brennan
President, School Outfitters

Human Centered Learning, By Design

Never before have we had such an opportunity in the world of education to personalize, or should we say, humanize, the learning experience. When we set out to change what the future of learning becomes, how do we support the student on their journey towards becoming an inspired freelance learner? How do we help the teaching community as they transition to becoming a mentor, coach, and friend? And how does space support and encourage both inspired learning, and teaching? Talking about it is one thing, but showing, and sharing, energizing models of human centered learning in today's world will provide us with a vision of what tomorrow’s learning will become.

Learning Objectives:

  • Explore how a bias towards human centered design can activate space that fosters human centered learning and emotional health.
  • Learn about Total Participation, and how framing a design expedition mindful of the student, teacher, and space, establishes a foundation for exponential cultural growth and mental wellbeing.
  • Engage in the journey towards establishing trust, and how designing for permission inspires the student to become an inspired freelance learner.
  • Explore a living story of how human centered learning supports the learner in their connection to their passion(s).
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Speaker
Jonathan Matta
Education Leader, KI
Speaker
Michael Meiners
Founder, Hackstudio; Student from Experience Institute
3:00 PM –
4:00 PM

Win-Win, School and Corporate Partnerships and their Impact on Learning

DePaul Cristo Rey High School opened in June 2011 as part of the national Cristo Rey Network to serve those families who want a private, college preparatory education for their children but can’t afford it without significant financial assistance. There are currently 32 Cristo Rey schools in 26 U.S. cities serving over 10,000 students. As part of their Corporate Work Study Program (CWSP), all students participate in the CWSP working five days a month in entry-level, professional positions at one of more than 100 Corporate Partner employers in Greater Cincinnati. This work offers real-world job experience while students earn a portion of the cost of their education. Academic schedules are structured so no class time is missed while students work. A required summer training program, CORE, helps prepare students for their jobs. Come learn about this unique partnership!

Learning Objectives:

  • Discover what 14 – 18 year olds can contribute while working in an architectural firm and earning their way to college.
  • Learn about an urban educational movement that is transforming low income students AND corporate environments.
  • See how a company’s philanthropic dollars can provide a return on investment while you work alongside some of a city’s youngest professionals.
  • Explore a proven model for adding to diversity to the business pipeline as we look to the next generation of college-educated professionals.
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Speaker
Sister Jeanne Bassette
OSF Ed.D., President, DePaul Cristo Rey High School

Creating Spaces that Build 21st Century Skills

As an educator, why should I transition from the “steady-standard” lecture style classroom to learning spaces that incorporate more active student learning? Do the benefits outweigh the risks? What are the risks if I don’t move to pedagogies that promote more student discovery? How can classroom arrangements facilitate different approaches to active student learning? This presentation aims to address these “why” questions, so we can more fully consider the “how” questions about designing learning spaces that help educators to equip students with the skills that they will need.

Learning Objectives:

  • Better understand the increasing demand for non-routine cognitive skills.
  • Better understand the link between active learning pedagogies and building non-routine cognitive skills.
  • Consider the relative strengths of different active learning approaches.
  • Consider how the arrangements of the classroom space can facilitate active student learning.
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Speaker
Greg Nelson
Sr. Manager, Customer & Market Research, School Outfitters

What Happens When Students Take Over? (Designs for Students by Students of Design)

Students in general are poorly represented in the design process for schools. This is despite the fact that we want the real world and the education environment to be more closely linked and collaborative than ever before. With these two facts in mind, School Outfitters in late 2015 established two different product design programs with leading design schools: the University of Cincinnati’s Design, Art, Architecture and Planning schools (DAAP), and Southern Illinois University’s school of Art and Design (SIU). These programs were designed to take student ideas from conceptualization through to eventual commercial products. This presentation will be interactive with heavy student feedback and will end with the sharing of several prototypes for commercial products that have emerged from the process.

Learning Objectives:

  • What is the current best practice for design development and how has it changed?
  • What particular insights do students bring to a project that companies don’t?
  • How can we incorporate student feedback more consistently to improve design?
  • What opportunities are there to integrate design into school curriculums?
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Moderator
Chris Lawson
Industrial Designer at School Outfitters

Speaker
John Dixon
Assistant Professor of Practice, University of Cincinnati Industrial Design Program
Speaker
Robert Lopez
Associate Professor of Design, Design Area Head, Southern Illinois University School of Art & Design
Speaker
Aaron Scott
Assistant Professor of Design at Southern Illinois University
3:00 PM –
4:30 PM

Envisioning the Future of School Food

Are you prepared for the future of school food? Learn about the trends in sustainable food and school building practices. Envision the future of school food where students will enjoy eating meals that are prepared from scratch using fresh ingredients from the school garden and local farms, where children will practice being good stewards of the earth by recycling and composting, and where they are engaged in learning about food and nutrition in green school dining centers and classrooms. This is the future of school food. Attend this presentation and learn what it takes to build a sustainable food community at a district near you.

Learning Objectives:

  • Learn about new trends in sustainable food and building environments.
  • Find out a proven process of elevating school food programs to serve fresh, scratch cooked foods within budget.
  • Learn how to engage the school community in the sustainable food journey.
  • Explore real-life examples of how this sustainable food model is working now.
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Speaker
Greg Christian
CEO/Founder, Beyond Green Sustainable Partners
Speaker
Karen Dittrich
Founder/Food Marketing Consultant, Creatif Leaf Marketing
Speaker
Leslie Johnson
VP for Finance and Operations, Nardin Academy
Speaker
Sheila Palinkas
FCSI, Principal, Senior Consultant, Foodservice Facility Designs by LMS Development, LLC
Speaker
Melanie Smythe
President, Candacity LLC
8:30 AM –
9:30 AM

CLOSING PLENARY: Designing the Conditions for Wonder: A New Vision for Teaching and Learning